Business, Marketing

Can you impress me in less than one second?

I’ve always chosen the path less traveled.

In high school, while most of my classmates chose to study one of the more popular languages, like Spanish or French, I chose the lesser popular “German studies.” Sprechen sie Deutsch?

Around 95% of my graduating class chose to attend the University of Missouri, otherwise known as “Mizzou”. I chose Missouri State University. It wasn’t because I couldn’t get accepted into Mizzou, but because I wanted to do what everyone else wasn’t. Not to mention the fact that MSU just so happens to have the largest and most highly accredited Business Administration program in the state. (Take that, Tigers!)

Following graduation, most everyone I knew moved back to St. Louis to start careers in the city they knew since birth. My husband and I decided to pack up and start careers in Kansas City – a place I had never even been before.

As I approach my XX birthday (a lady never tells her age), I see that most of these same people have long started their own families. But instead of swan diving into parenthood this year, my husband and I decided to take a bucket list trip to the Maldives. It was incredible. See?

photo

I was recently reminded of this habit of going “against the grain” during a conversation with a prominent senior VP of marketing communications. She mentioned that one of her best marketing strategies is to do the opposite of what everyone else is doing. This strategy has worked quite well for her over the years.

I’d say this same strategy has worked pretty well for me, too – which got me thinking.

What’s something that everyone is doing right now?

Digital marketing.

What’s something hardly no one is doing right now?

Direct mail.

Well, I’ll take that back. There are still quite a few companies out there with a direct mail strategy; however, according to the Winter 2015 issue of “Chief Marketer”, direct mail volume is down overall.

Let’s rephrase the question then, shall we?

What’s something hardly no is doing effectively right now?

Direct mail.

Direct mail today is bad. Really bad. Maybe my mailbox is just unfortunate in that it attracts poorly executed pieces, like the pretty girl in high school that for whatever reason couldn’t land a decent boyfriend.

I still get excited to check the mail. I’m not sure what that says about me, but I can’t be the only one. Remember the days when people sent handwritten letters? How unfortunate to think that those born after the year 2000 probably don’t even have that recollection. It’s still a treat when I find a handwritten note or personalized card in my mailbox, although such occasions are usually reserved for holidays or following the attendance of a wedding. More typical is that I open my mailbox to disappointments similar to this:

MailPieces

According to Michael Fortin of The Licorice Group, it takes a person less than one second to decide whether or not to throw away a direct mail piece.

Capturing attention through direct mail is by no means an easy task, and perhaps is the reason why so many fail. But, the challenge can be worth the strife. Consider that physical marketing materials such as direct mail better engage your audience and trigger more emotional responses than digital marketing, according to a study conducted by Millward Brown, Using Neuroscience to Understand the Role of Direct Mail. The result? Deeper brand engagement.

This isn’t true for just any old mailer though. You have to get noticed.

It’s not enough to just be where others aren’t. Once you’re there, you have to do it better.

When is the last time a direct mail piece stopped you in your tracks? Better yet…when was the last time you were so impressed by a mailer that you actually wanted to save it, to show it off, like Phil? Phil from Paragon Design was absolutely wooed by this promotional piece from Veer – find out why here.

veer-1

This gives me hope. It tells me there are well-done direct mail pieces out there – somewhere. So, I’m going to hold a little contest. You could win one million dollars.

Not really. But there is a prize. Read on.

The request:

Send me a picture of the most impressive direct mail piece you’ve ever received. Tell me about what makes the piece so effective.

Judging rules:

Your submission must capture my attention in less than one second. (Yes – we’re going to be true to life here.)

Where most see this as a challenge, I see an opportunity. Perhaps it’s that “against the grain” mindset kicking in once again.

The top three submissions will be featured in an upcoming post.

To inspire your journey, I’ll leave you with this excerpt from Robert Frost’s classic poem, “The Road Not Taken”:

Two roads diverged in a wood,

and I –

I took the one less traveled by,

And that has made all the difference.

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